Neyman Seminar

The Neyman seminar is the statistics seminar in the Department. Historically, it has been focused on applications of Statistics to other fields. Nowadays, it has a very broad scope, with topics ranging from applications of statistics to theory.

The seminar is held on Wednesdays from 4 to 5 in the Jerzy Neyman room, 1011 Evans.

Details of individual seminar events are published in the campus' event system.

You can sign up to the department's seminars@stat mailing list to receive related announcements.

Add this series of events to your calendar: ICAL or XML

Recent & Upcoming Neyman Seminars

Danny Hernandez, OpenAI
Sep 11, 2019 4:00pm
1011 Evans Hall
Abstract:
Everyone makes bets. Scientists bet years of their lives on research agendas, CEO’s bet billions of dollars on new products, and world leaders bet our welfare through their policies. Their decisions often hinge on implicit judgement based predictions about relatively one-off events rather than on data. We’ll review the most promising existing techniques for improving one’s predictions. I’ll...
Neyman Seminar
Hongyuan Cao, Florida State University
Sep 18, 2019 4:00pm
1011 Evans Hall
Abstract:
Extended follow-up with longitudinal data is common in many medical investigations. In regression analyses, a longitudinal covariate may be omitted, often because it is not measured synchronously with the longitudinal response. Naive approach that simply ignores the omitted longitudinal covariate can lead to biased estimators. In this article, we establish conditions under which estimation is...
Neyman Seminar
Purnamrita Sarkar, UT Austin
Sep 25, 2019 4:00pm
1011 Evans Hall
Abstract:
People belong to multiple communities, words belong to multiple topics, and books cover multiple genres; overlapping clusters are commonplace. Many existing overlapping clustering methods model each person (or word, or book) as a non-negative weighted combination of “exemplars” who belong solely to one community, with some small noise. Geometrically, each person is a point on a cone whose corners...
Neyman Seminar